Call for Abstract

7th International Conference on Infectious Diseases & Antibiotics, will be organized around the theme “ Exploring Innovative Research in Infectious Diseases and Antibiotics”

Infectious Diseases 2020 is comprised of keynote and speakers sessions on latest cutting edge research designed to offer comprehensive global discussions that address current issues in Infectious Diseases 2020

Submit your abstract to any of the mentioned tracks.

Register now for the conference by choosing an appropriate package suitable to you.

Human infectious disease outbreaks across the world are spanning since multiple decades. They are a major public health concern globally and kill more people worldwide than any other cause, with more effect on developing countries. Increased development, global homogeneity resulting from increased travel, trade, social and environmental changes resulting from globalisation are increasing the risk of Infectious Diseases. The term infectious diseases means illnesses caused by germs (such as bacteria, viruses, and fungi) that enter the body, multiply, and can cause an infection.  Some infectious diseases are contagious while others are not.

Infectious diseases can be spread by germs carried in air, water, food, or soil. They can also be spread by vectors, Bacteria, viruses or by animals.

 

  • Track 1-1Bone and joint infections
  • Track 1-2Fever of unknown origins
  • Track 1-3HIV/AIDS
  • Track 1-4Infectious mononucleosis
  • Track 1-5Lyme disease
  • Track 1-6Meningitis
  • Track 1-7MRSA (methicillin-resistant staphylococcus aureus)
  • Track 1-8Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV)
  • Track 1-9Staph infections
  • Track 1-10Tuberculosis
  • Track 1-11Influenza
  • Track 1-12Meningococcal disease
  • Track 1-13Parvovirus infection

Immunology of infections means the battle between pathogens and the host immune defences. Immunology is the branch of science concerned with the various aspects related to immune system, innate and acquired immunity. Immunology also deals with laboratory techniques involving the interaction of antigens with specific antibodies.

 

Treatment of viral infections such as HIV involves patient care and moral support including antiretroviral therapy. Bacterial infections can be treated by administering antibiotics to the patients. Yeast infections can be primarily treated by sterilisation methods. Parasitic infections can be treated by antiparasitic drugs. Diseases such as cancer can be treated by chemotherapy. Recent techniques have proved that there is no disease that cannot be treated.

 

Lyme disease is caused by bacteria known as Borrelia burgdorferi. It is transmitted to humans through the bite of infected blacklegged ticks. Typical symptoms include fever, fatigue, headache and a characteristic skin rash called erythema migrans. If it is left untreated, the infection can spread to joints, the heart, and the nervous system. This disease is treated based on symptoms, physical findings (e.g., rash), and the possibility of exposure to infected ticks. Laboratory testing is helpful if used correctly and performed with validated methods. Most cases of Lyme disease can be treated successfully with a few weeks of antibiotics. The measures to prevent Lyme disease include using applying pesticides, insect repellent, removing ticks promptly and reducing tick habitat.

 

  • Track 4-1Current Efforts in Lyme Disease Research
  • Track 4-2Studies on Pathogenesis
  • Track 4-3Studies on the Vector
  • Track 4-4Studies on Persistence of Infection
  • Track 4-5Studies on Lyme Disease Diagnostic Testing
  • Track 4-6Studies on Lyme Vaccines
  • Track 4-7Clinical Studies

Fifth disease is a mild rash infection caused by parvovirus B19. This disease is also known as erythema infectiosum. It is more common in children than adults.  A person usually gets sick with fifth disease within four to 14 days after getting infected with parvovirus B19. The major symptoms of fifth disease are usually mild and may include fever, running nose, and headache. This disease is contagious because the rash is due to an immune system reaction that happens after the infection has passed. Anyone with fifth disease is most contagious before the rash appears. Children usually don't spread the infection once they have the rash. This disease is caused by a virus, so it can't be treated with antibiotics. In most cases, it is a mild illness that clears up on its own and no medicine is needed.

 

  • Track 5-1Human parvovirus
  • Track 5-2Diagnosis and treatment
  • Track 5-3Fifth Disease & Pregnancy

Autoimmune disease affects 50 million people all around the world. It is one of the top ten causes of death in women under the age of 65, is the second highest cause of chronic illness, and is the top cause of morbidity in women in the United States. These diseases are an effect of a dysfunction of the immune system. The immune system protects a person from infection and disease. At times, the immune system produces autoantibodies that attack healthy cells, tissues, and organs. This can lead to autoimmune disease. It can affect any part of the body. Some of the well-known auto immune disorders are: type 1 diabetes, multiple sclerosis, lupus, and rheumatoid arthritis, and Celiac disease while others are rare and difficult to diagnose. There are autoimmune diseases which are life-threatening, and most of them weaken the Human Immune System and require a lifetime of treatment. There are treatments available to reduce the symptoms and effects from many autoimmune diseases, but cures are yet to be discovered. Since most autoimmune diseases are rare, patients spend years seeking a proper diagnosis.

 

  • Track 6-1The Diverse Array of Autoimmune Diseases
  • Track 6-2The Diverse Array of Autoimmune Diseases
  • Track 6-3Cancer
  • Track 6-4Celiac disease
  • Track 6-5Clinical Trials
  • Track 6-6Translational Research
  • Track 6-7Lupus
  • Track 6-8Multiple sclerosis
  • Track 6-9Rheumatoid arthritis

H5N1 infection in humans can cause severe disease and has a high mortality rate. It is the most common form of bird flu Influenza that is distributed through the world. It has caused symptomatic and asymptomatic infections in many vertebrate species, including a large variety of birds such as ducks, geese, terns, chickens, quail, turkeys, pheasants, starlings, and budgerigars, as well as in gibbons, baboons, chimpanzees and humans. In many cases, bird flu in humans grows into a serious disease that should be treated on time in the hospital and may require intensive care. People who work with poultry farming are suggested to follow biosecurity and infection control practices. They include the use of suitable personal protective equipment and careful attention to hygiene. The antiviral medicine oseltamivir can decrease the severity of illness and prevent death. It should be used in all cases.

 

  • Track 7-1Antiviral medicines
  • Track 7-2Seasonal influenza
  • Track 7-3Pandemic influenza & management
  • Track 7-4Avoid Sources of Exposure
  • Track 7-5Biosecurity
  • Track 7-6Infection control practices

These infection spread was by Aedas mosquito. These infections cause birth absconds in babies by tainted pregnant ladies, side effects are gentle fever, skin rash, conjunctivitis, muscle and joint agony, disquietude or migraine. These keep going for 2-7 days this contamination was affirmed by research facility tests on blood or other body liquids, for example, pee, spit or semen. Ebola infection sickness (EVD), is normally called as Ebola hemorrhagic fever (EHF) or Ebola, signs and manifestations ordinarily begin between two days and three weeks subsequent to getting the infection with a fever, sore throat, strong torment and migraine at that point, spewing, the runs and rash typically take after, alongside diminished capacity of the liver and kidneys.

 

  • Track 8-1Molecular pathogenesis
  • Track 8-2Cellular microbiology
  • Track 8-3Virulence factors
  • Track 8-4Host resistance

The symptoms of an infection depend on the organism responsible and the site of the infection. Viruses target specific cells, such as those in the upper respiratory tract or genitals.  For example, the rabies virus, targets the nervous system. Some viruses target skin cells, causing warts. Others target a wider range of cells, leading to various symptoms. A flu virus can cause a running nose, allergic reactions, muscle aches, and an upset stomach. The cause of an infection is said to be any type of organism that has invaded the body. A particular virus, for example, will be the cause of a viral infection. There can be numerous causes for an infection.

 

  • Track 9-1Fever
  • Track 9-2Diarrhoea
  • Track 9-3Fatigue
  • Track 9-4Muscle aches
  • Track 9-5Coughing
  • Track 9-6Running nose
  • Track 9-7Allergies

The feasibility of disease control is hampered potentially by vast number of emerging and re-emerging pathogens, the diversity of geographic sources, the potential for rapid global dissemination from these sources, and numerous ecologic and social factors influencing emergence. A disease is an emerging disease only when it is completely a new infection or it has recently increased in impact and severity and affected newer locations across the globe. Re-Emerging diseases are the ones who were known as major health problems at one time, but had declined and now are again becoming health problems for the people.  

 

  • Track 10-1Acanthamebiasis
  • Track 10-2Hepatitis C
  • Track 10-3MRSA Infection
  • Track 10-4Hepatitis E
  • Track 10-5Coccidioides immitis
  • Track 10-6Enterovirus 71
  • Track 10-7Prion diseases
  • Track 10-8Streptococcus, group A
  • Track 10-9H5N1 Influenza
  • Track 10-10Hendra virus (equine morbilli virus)
  • Track 10-11Helicobacter pylori
  • Track 10-12Australian bat lyssavirus
  • Track 10-13Babesia, atypical
  • Track 10-14Bartonella henselae
  • Track 10-15Coronaviruses, including SARS coronavirus
  • Track 10-16Ehrlichiosis
  • Track 10-17Encephalitozoon cuniculi
  • Track 10-18Encephalitozoon hellem
  • Track 10-19Enterocytozoon bieneusi
  • Track 10-20Staphylococcus aureus

Zika is a single-stranded RNA flavivirus, a member of the Flaviviridae family. The virus is genetically linked to some others responsible for encephalitis in humans, including chikungunya, dengue, West Nile, and the yellow fever virus. It is one of the arboviruses transmitted by Aedes mosquitoes. The main vectors are Aedes aegypti and Aedes albopictus. It causes severe haemorrhagic fever with high mortality rates in humans. As the virus spreads through the body, it damages the immune system and organs. Eventually, it causes levels of blood-clotting cells to drop. This leads to severe, uncontrollable bleeding.

 

  • Track 11-1Therapeutic Strategies
  • Track 11-2Clinical Manifestation
  • Track 11-3Vaccine Developments
  • Track 11-4Challenges of Treatment of Zika Virus

The recent outbreak of Ebola virus disease in both developing and developed countries reminded us the great threat of emerging infectious diseases. Ebola viruses are highly communicable once early symptoms develop. The infected patients shed infectious viruses in all body secretions or fluids. If any individual comes in direct contact with any of these secretions it may cause virus transmission to them. The infection spreads by direct contact with blood and secretions, or the ones that remain on clothing, and by any equipments used to treat patients. There’s no cure for Ebola till date. Drugs like ZMapp and TKM-Ebola are being used for treatment. Specialists prescribe medicines such as acetaminophen (Tylenol) to reduce fever and pain. Treatment includes an experimental serum that destroys the infected cells.

 

 

  • Track 12-1Acetaminophen
  • Track 12-2ZMapp and TKM-Ebola
  • Track 12-3Epidemiology of Ebola Virus

Children are more susceptible to environmental risks than adults because of a number of reasons. Children are constantly growing and so and they eat more food, drink more water, and breathe more air as compared to adults. They have increased vulnerability to illness. These contagious diseases are mostly caused by microscopic organisms, infections and parasites. A widespread variety of immunologic illnesses are caused by micro-organisms, infections, pathogens, bacteria and parasites. Paediatric specialists may understand the symptoms, signs, causes, side effects, medicines, and results related with infectious diseases in children.

 

  • Track 13-1Chicken Pox
  • Track 13-2Scarlet Fever
  • Track 13-3Scabies
  • Track 13-4Mumps
  • Track 13-5Molluscum Contagiosum
  • Track 13-6Meningococcal Disease
  • Track 13-7Measles
  • Track 13-8Influenza
  • Track 13-9Impetigo (school sores)
  • Track 13-10Hepatitis A
  • Track 13-11Head Lice
  • Track 13-12Hand Foot and Mouth Disease]
  • Track 13-13Glandular Fever
  • Track 13-14German Measles (Rubella)
  • Track 13-15Gastroenteritis
  • Track 13-16Conjunctivitis
  • Track 13-17Whooping Cough

During a normal day, a person usually breathes nearly 25,000 times. The term respiratory disease refers to many disorders affecting the lungs, such as asthma, COPD, infections like influenza, pneumonia and tuberculosis, lung cancer and many other breathing problems. Some lung diseases can lead to respiratory failure out which a few are contagious and rest are not.  The features of different respiratory tract infections largely depend on the structures where inflammation is localised and the extent to which function is altered.

Therefore, infection of the nasopharynx, results in a nasal discharge, bronchitis in cough and sputum production, and pneumonia in cough and sputum, but also in increased respiratory rate and chest radiograph changes. Most upper respiratory tract infections are caused by viruses and are self-limiting.

 

  • Track 14-1Pneumonia
  • Track 14-2Influenza
  • Track 14-3Pharyngitis
  • Track 14-4Acute sinusitis
  • Track 14-5Laryngitis
  • Track 14-6Empyema

The epidemiology of infectious or contagious diseases involves study of the prevalence, incidence and factors of infections in populations. They remain to be one of the most important causes of morbidity and mortality across the globe.

 

  • Track 15-1Epidemiology of emerging and re-emerging infections
  • Track 15-2Development of vaccines and other prevention methods
  • Track 15-3Clinical trials
  • Track 15-4Role of infectious pathogens in the pathogenesis

Many pathogens and pathogenic agents are transmitted via blood, causing infection. Infusion of blood or its components into the body, or blood transfusion, imports a much greater amount of infectious agents into blood vessels compared to an accidental needle prick. Infectious agents which are transmitted by blood include hepatitis viruses, syphilitic spirochete, and retroviruses such as adult T cell leukaemia viruses and AIDS viruses.

 

  • Track 16-1Sepsis
  • Track 16-2Dengue Fever
  • Track 16-3Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV)
  • Track 16-4Hepatitis A, B, and C

Sexually Transmitted Disease is a type of infection of the reproductive tract. They are also referred to as sexually transmitted infections, or genital sickness. Endogenous infections and iatrogenic infections are the other types of reproductive tract infections. Endogenous infections are usually caused due to overgrowth of organisms that are normally present in the genital tract. One example of an endogenous infection is bacterial vaginosis. Other genital diseases include syphilis, herpes simplex virus (HSV), chancroid, lymphogranuloma venereum (LGV), human papillomavirus infection (HPV), and Chlamydia/gonorrhea. Viral STDs cannot currently be cured, but treatment can relieve some of their symptoms and reduce the severity of some of their consequences.

 

  • Track 17-1Endogenous infections
  • Track 17-2Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV)
  • Track 17-3Trichomoniasis
  • Track 17-4Chlamydia/gonorrhoea
  • Track 17-5Human papillomavirus infection (HPV)
  • Track 17-6Lymphogranuloma venereum (LGV)
  • Track 17-7Chancroid
  • Track 17-8Herpes simplex virus (HSV)
  • Track 17-9Syphilis
  • Track 17-10Bacterial vaginosis
  • Track 17-11Iatrogenic infections
  • Track 17-12Genitial Herpes

Viral hepatitis is a global public health problem affecting millions of people every year, all around the world causing disability and death. Reasonable measures, such as vaccination, safe injections, safe food, and safe blood supply can decrease the rate of transmission of viral hepatitis. Many of these measures not only reduce the transmission of viral hepatitis but also have spill over effects on the prevention of various other contagious diseases. Furthermore, current therapies for hepatitis B and C give health care providers effective tools to combat the disease. New advanced therapies are also being developed for hepatitis B and C, and the future is more promising than ever. Antiretrovirals such as  TDF, 3TC, & FTC are effective for treatment of both HIV and HBV infections. The co-infected patients can take fewer drugs to treat these two diseases. Viral hepatitis can also be prevented by taking vaccines on time and maintaining proper hygiene.

  • Track 18-1Screening test
  • Track 18-2Antiretroviral drugs
  • Track 18-3Safe injection practices
  • Track 18-4Blood safety strategies
  • Track 18-5Evaluation and Management of chronically-infected persons
  • Track 18-6Personal & Community Hygiene
  • Track 18-7Antiviral Drugs like lamivudine,& Adefovir
  • Track 18-8Pegylated interferon Injections

There is famous saying " A man's weakness is not achieving victories, but in taking advantage of them." This is a fact in the case for global infection control or global eradication of diseases. The most common debate among public health practitioners is how existing health technologies can be used to decrease infectious disease incidence and prevalence. Till date only one disease, smallpox, has been eradicated by vaccines, saving almost 5 million lives yearly. Regular application of personal and community hygiene, sanitation, environmental modification, vaccines and vector control have led, in many countries, to the interruption of transmission of microbes causing such diseases as cholera, yellow fever and malaria. We can hope that advancements in technology may someday hep in eradicating infectious diseases globally.

 

In spite of noteworthy advancements in the treatment of infectious diseases, central nervous system (CNS) infections still remain a major challenge. They are often difficult to diagnose, and treatments are insufficient or non-existent. Infections can be categorised as acute or chronic. Infection of the nervous system may comprise of meninges (meningitis) or the brain substance itself (encephalitis), or both of them (meningoencephalitis). Some infections trigger an inflammatory reaction that causes neurological damage independently   or coincide with the infection. In some inflammatory conditions, new issues may arise which might be related to the disease. These differences are of fundamental importance, as management and outcomes can be impacted by timely initiation of therapy.

 

  • Track 20-1Toscana Virus Infection
  • Track 20-2Meningitis
  • Track 20-3Encephalitis
  • Track 20-4Multifocal Leukoencephalopathy
  • Track 20-5Neurosarcoidosis
  • Track 20-6Transverse myelitis
  • Track 20-7Hydrocephaly
  • Track 20-8Parameningeal

MRSA is presently a pathogen of global health concern. . They are S. aureus strains that are resistant to oxacillin, nafcillin and methicillin. They can also be resistant to all ß-lactam agents.  It can cause a variety of problems ranging from skin infections and sepsis to pneumonia and various types of bloodstream infections. The infections occur commonly among people in hospitals and healthcare facilities such as nursing homes, diagnostic centres and dialysis centres, who have less stable immune systems. The current arsenal of antibiotics available for the treatment of MRSA includes a topical agent, a limited number of oral agents.

 

  • Track 21-1Community-acquired MRSA (CA-MRSA)
  • Track 21-2Chronic osteomyelitis (COM)
  • Track 21-3Pneumonia (HAP/VAP)
  • Track 21-4Vancomycin, Clindamycin and linezolid
  • Track 21-5Topical agents
  • Track 21-6Oral and intravenous agents
  • Track 21-7Recurrent MRSA Infections
  • Track 21-8Antibiotic resistance
  • Track 21-9Virulence Associated Factors of CA-MRSA
  • Track 21-10Healthcare-associated MRSA (HA-MRSA)
  • Track 21-11Skin and soft tissue infections

A severe pandemic could kill millions and costs trillions of dollars Pandemic refers to an infectious disease that spreads globally and causes mortality on a significant scale. A disease is considered epidemic when the number of cases rises above what would normally be expected in a given area. Epidemics have posed a perpetual threat to human health throughout history. In spite of remarkable advances in infectious disease prevention, control and treatment, epidemics still continue to threaten populations as new diseases emerge and some old ones return. While most epidemics involve an infectious cause, changing behavior patterns have led to epidemic levels of some chronic diseases. There have been innumerable outbreaks of serious infectious diseases across the globe. It is expected that a few diseases might cause severe epidemics. They include Ebola, Crimean-Congo haemorrhagic fever, Lassa fever, Rift Valley fever, Chikungunya, Zika, Marburg, and SARS.

 

  • Track 22-1Common source outbreak
  • Track 22-2Propagated outbreak
  • Track 22-3Asian flu
  • Track 22-4Swine Flu
  • Track 22-5Lassa fever
  • Track 22-6Rift Valley fever
  • Track 22-7SARS
  • Track 22-8Crimean-Congo haemorrhagic fever

Vaccination has made a huge contribution towards global health. It is a highly effective method of preventing certain infectious diseases. Vaccines are generally very safe, and severe or adverse reactions are uncommon. Vaccines are of many types and they help to develop immunity by imitating an infection. Two major infections, smallpox and rinderpest, have been eradicated with the help of these vaccines but diseases like Viral hepatitis, influenza, and tuberculosis (TB) remain among the leading causes of illness and death thought the world. The diseases for which vaccines are available are Measles, Rubella, Cholera, Meningococcal disease, Poliomyelitis, Varicella and herpes zoster (shingles).

 

  • Track 23-1Live, attenuated vaccines
  • Track 23-2Inactivated vaccines
  • Track 23-3Toxoid vaccines
  • Track 23-4Conjugate vaccines
  • Track 23-5Subunit vaccines

Infectious and parasitic disease control is important in veterinary clinics. The main aim is to prevent the spread of infections and infestations. Veterinary infectious diseases are caused by bacteria, fungi, viruses, and parasites. These infections and diseases may be spread or transmitted from human to human, human to animal, and animal to human.

 

Rheumatic heart disease is a complication of rheumatic fever in which the heart valves are damaged. Rheumatic fever is an inflammatory disease that arises with strep throat. It harms the connective tissues throughout the body, mainly in the heart, joints, brain and skin. The best way to prevent rheumatic fever is to treat strep throat with antibiotics. Treatment of this disease includes antibiotics treatment for strep infection and additional medications to ease the inflammation of the heart and other symptoms. Aspirin is usually given in large doses until the joint inflammation goes away. Once the acute illness has gone away, patients need to take antibiotics, for many years to prevent recurrences. This is a very important treatment because the risk of heart valve damage increases if rheumatic fever recurs.

 

  • Track 25-1Diagnosis
  • Track 25-2Echocardiography
  • Track 25-3Prevention using antibiotic therapy
  • Track 25-4Surgical repair or replacement of a damaged heart valve
  • Track 25-5Genetic susceptibility

Mechanism of resistance towards antimicrobials by microorganisms includes the following mechanisms of enzymatic destruction, enzymatic modification, altered target and decreased uptake. Mechanism of resistance is due to the inactivation or modification of antibiotics, an alteration in the target site of the antibiotic that reduces its binding capacity, the modification of metabolic pathways to circumvent the antibiotic effect and the reduced intracellular antibiotic accumulation by decreasing permeability and/ or increasing active efflux of the antibiotic.